Worktop Solid Wood

FAQ to Kitchen Worktops Direct

  1. What Hardwood kitchen worktop should I choose?
  2. What is the best value for money hardwood?
  3. How often should I oil my Kitchen hardwood worktops?
  4. How do I treat my hardwood kitchen worktops?
  5. How should the wood be joined?
  6. How do I know what lengths of wood I need?
  7. Should the wood be cut on site?
  8. Should I have the wood pre cut?
  9. How do I store wood after delivery?
  10. What if I don't like the wood?
  11. What quality is your wood?
  12. What's the difference between woods?
  13. Is a sample necessary?
  14. What guarantees does the wood have?

Answers

  1. What Hardwood worktop should I choose?

    Colour and cost usually determines your choice of wood. Though bear in mind that some woods are more durable than others. You may get the price you want, but regret not investing in a tougher top, after the battle scars start to appear. Aspects to consider in your selection are; what colour of doors has the wood to go with? Is the room bright? These two questions will help you define if the top should be a light, medium coloured or dark wood. Do you want the wood to be a passive element of the overall project or a focal point requiring lots of character?
  2. What is the best value for money?

    The cheapest would be rubber wood, which is an entry - level hardwood for a kitchen worktop. Rustic Beech, in our opinion is the best by way of character, durability and price. A Rustic Beech top is a very well priced worktop, which with 5 coats of oil would create a fine, warm and welcome focal point.
  3. How often should I oil my kitchen hardwood worktops?

    We would recommend that you use 3 coats on the flat surface of High Grade Danish wood oil. This will make most tops thoroughly water repellent and provide a tough durable preparation work surface. We would also suggest you use 5 coats on the edges and cut outs, particularly around the sink areas to protect these more exposed areas. Further coats on the flat surface will only serve to increase protection and enhance the character and grain of wood. The benefit of this is more evident on character woods such as Rustic Beech, Iroko and solid Oak. For normal maintenance, you could set yourself a three monthly regime, or alternately you will see if your worktops require re-oiling, as they will have lost their sheen effect and become matt in appearance. These areas are usually sunspots and hot spots; areas where the sun is more focused on a particular part, around a cooking appliance, above fridges and freezers, below kettles and toasters etc.
  4. How do I treat my hardwood kitchen worktops?

    See treating and caring for your solid hardwood worktops.
  5. How should the wood be joined?

    See Planning and Installation instructions
  6. How do I know what lengths of wood I need?

    See Planning and Installation instructions.
  7. Should the wood be cut on site?

    In our experience, most walls are not quite true or straight, and corners can easily not be at a right angle. It has often proved better and more economical to have wood delivered in uncut lengths, to be cut and shaped on site. See Planning and Installation instructions.
  8. Should I have the wood precut?

    This service is available and successful, if you have a detailed template or an architectural drawing can be provided. Simply list all your requirements including worktop sizes, sink and hob cut outs, drainer grooves and preferred edge detail. In our experience as most walls are not completely straight and corners vary, it has often proved better and more economical to have wood delivered in uncut lengths, to be cut and shaped on site. See Planning and Installation instructions.
  9. How do I store wood after delivery?

    You are advised to keep the wood stored flat in the project area for approximately 48 hours after installation. This procedure allows a humidity level adjustment. Should the wood be stored for longer than 4 days, we recommend rotating it. Please revolve each length and change the worktop that was on the top to the bottom.
  10. What if I don't like the wood?

    Buying wood could seem similar to buying a pet. If you have strong expectations of what you wanted and the character you get doesn't immediately fit that bill, you could initially be disappointed. However once you've had a good look at your investment oiled, you will really like it. At the time of writing we have not had one single wooden worktop returned to us in over 12 years.

    It is worth noting that neither online swatches, nor actual samples are oiled and will differ significantly once several coats of oil are applied, particularly in the case of Iroko. You should also consider that it is highly unlikely that both your sample and your hard wood order will come from the same consignment. Wood from different parts of the tree can differ widely in character, more so hardwoods from different parts of the forest, or even different forests for that matter.

    If in the very worst case you decide you do not wish to keep the wood, it is returnable with a 25% restocking, plus fragile goods, reshipping charge, which is carried out at your risk and expense. Unfortunately this would remain applicable even if returned by the same carrier that delivered it. Return delivery would have to be charged at full fragile goods cost. Once the wood was received back to into stock and checked as resalable in its original packaging, your account would be credited, less the above charges. Wood is classed as unique, and is an individual item; therefore it is sold as a specialist item that once bought is returned at the sellers' discretion.
  11. What quality is your wood?

    Certainly nothing to do with the cheap, unseasoned D, F grade wood, that some less scrupulous merchants are prepared to supply to you. 95% of our hardwoods are seasoned AA+ grade; we do not sell seconds and casualties are sold as casualties.
  12. What's the difference between woods?

    Typically this question is answered by stating that price, character and durability are the defining factors of difference. See each individual wood description for more detailed information.
  13. Is a sample necessary?

    A sample can often help, if you feel the online enlarged image is not sufficient for you to confirm your choice. However it is worth noting that neither on line swatches nor actual samples are oiled and will differ significantly once several coats of oil are supplied, particularly in the case of iroko. You should also consider that it is highly unlikely that both your sample and your hardwood order will come from the same assignment.
  14. What guarantee does the wood have?

    Like any living species you may buy, the guarantee is as good as the care you give it. We are pleased to say that in over 20 years in the home improvement supply industry; we have never received a top back, because of twisting or poor quality.

    We supply top grade wood, harvested from sustainable sources and crafted in well-managed mills, then delivered to you, by fragile goods carriers. This does not affect your statutory rights.